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View from South Foreland Lighthouse, looking towards France. What role has history played in the recent EU referendum? See below...

 

Welcome to InfoBritain, for historical visiting information in the UK. InfoBritain tells you what happened and where it happened. We have articles and visits relating to all historical periods from prehistoric Britain to recent times, and to the lives of major British authors, artists, musicians, scientists, politicians, military and royal figures. You can use our site search, or our various menus to find suggested visits relating to times or people. Alternatively go to the regions menu, find a place to visit in a particular area, and then link back to the history relating to it. We also have a full accommodation booking service for all parts of the mainland UK. We specialise in historic accommodation, but we also have comprehensive lists of hotels of all types and price ranges. See the regional menus on the right. Enjoy!

An alphabetical index is available below.

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A Personal Note (Archive)

June 27, 2016

I am interested in history, which since the European referendum on Friday has felt like a bad thing.  It was in the countryside, in all those English market towns and villages where people revere “heritage” that the EU referendum vote was lost.  In the cities full of cranes and change, Remain did well.  For a few hours on Friday morning I wanted to turn my back on history.  But then I reminded myself that heritage is not history.  History shows that Britain has never really been an island.  Its road system still reflects the influence of the Romans; its language is full of words derived from successive waves of Saxon, Scandinavian and Norman invaders; its laws revere a document called the Magna Carta signed by French nobles; its brief history as a global power owes much to continental banking ideas that came to Britain with the Dutch monarch, William of Orange.  “Heritage” ignores all this.  Heritage describes something that comes to you as a reason of birth. It suggests not so much what happened, as the picking through what happened to bolster a sense of entitlement.  Since Friday morning entitlement has been revealed as empty posturing, and it has become clear that English Heritage is an organisation that should change its name.

 

Best wishes

Martin

The InfoBritain view of history (with thanks to The Simpsons)

 

Historical news for July

This year is the 300th anniversary of the birth of landscape gardener Capability Brown. The National Trust is celebrating this with events at many of its properties across the country. For more information go to http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/lists/events-to-celebrate-the-300th-anniversary-of-capability-brown

 

Anniversaries for July

6th July 1952: London's final tram journey takes place, beween Woolwich and New Cross. The usual journey time is extended by three hours due to slow progress through cheering crowds.

8th July 2000: The fourth book of the Harry Potter series is published. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire has an initial print run of 5.3 million copies. Many fans bought the book when bookshops opened at midnight.

11th July 1979: The American space station Skylab falls to Earth, leaving a trail of debris in the Indian Oean and Western Australia

15th July 2006: The social media platform Twitter is launched. By March 2016 the site had 310 million active users.

23rd July 1986: Prince Andrew marries Sarah Ferguson at Westminster Abbey. They were to divroce ten years later.

26th July 1942: Whilst out training with the Home Guard, writer George Orwell sees a number of small groups of regular soliders camped in the countryside: ."Yesterday and today, on the Home Guard manoeuvres, passing various small camps of soldiers in the woods... Struck by the appearance of the soldiers, their magnificent health and the brutalized look in their faces. All young and fresh, with round fat limbs and rosy faces with beautiful clear skins. But sullen brutish expressions – not fierce or wicked in any way, but simply stupefied by boredom, loneliness, discontent, endless tiredness and mere physical health."

 

A preview of my novel - about a girl who discovers that surprisingly she can't find her way to the sort of secret world found in story books. So she searches for an alternative.

 

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Almost all photography on InfoBritain is by InfoBritain or by named contributors. All educational use is permitted, but copyright is reserved for commercial uses. Occasionally we have used copyright free stock images which are available for any use. A note will identify these images.

Thank you to photo contributors Danielle Davis, Jean Edwards, Vicky Eagle of Portsmouth Dockyard, Kevin Edwards, Derick Fusco, Julian Jones, Richard Jones, Jackie Lewis, Debbie Lowless, Judy Mills of the Corinium Museum, Jane Barron of the World Rugby Museum, and Susan Stuart of Old Spitalfields Market.

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